Anonymous asked: Hi, just wanna say that I simply adore your blog first off. :-)
But to the point, I know your dresses are usually 1700s to the 60s, but we are doing a big medieval fair at my school, which of course requires costumes. And you are the historical fashionista to turn to, so do you have any ideas, pictures or examples that can help me out? THANKS!!

Thanks! Here are two very good sources for medieval costume. 

http://medievalmuse-arteffex.blogspot.com/

http://www.costumes.org/history/100pages/medievalinks.htm

The first is a great blog that features a lot of movie costumes from that era and the second is an excellent costume site that has pictures, links to other resources and even instructions on how to create your own costume! Sadly fabric only lasts so long so there are not many extant examples out there so we have to rely on illustrations of the era and other costumers interpretations of them. I hope this helps! 

p.s. I prefer to be called a “fashionisto”..haha.

Hoschedé Rebours | c. 1885

This low, cleavage baring neckline probably caused the wearer some sneers.

via the Metropolitan Museum of Art

morrgg asked: Did you ever post the Chanel hats?

I haven’t yet. The book that I am thinking they are in is in the costume shop at school. I will post them soon. I have looked online and there are very few pictures. Does anyone else know where to find photos of Coco Chanel’s hats she designed when she was a milliner?

papageorgio asked: Do you, by chance, have the source for that photo of Natalie Wood's 1966 black dress? I'd love to read up on it a bit. Thankies!

I am not sure what photo you are speaking of.

burntbythesun asked: Your blog's my new favorite.
Where do you go to school?

Thanks! I am currently at Florida State..about to start my last semester!!!

fuckyeahhollywoodcostume:

Pirates of the Caribbean - Kiera Knightley - Wedding Dress 

by Penny Rose

Ball Gown | c. 1861

Visiting Dress | c. 1870-75

I love this color combo.

Cotton Dress | c. 1872

Corset | Royal Worcester Corset Co. | c. 1876

Known as the ‘Bon Ton’, this corset was awarded the bronze medal at the Centennial Exposition. The fine embroidery representing traditional motifs of oak leaves and wheat ears symbolize well-being and prosperity. During this period, a woman’s dress was very representative of her class and so having an embellished undergarment with these motifs would be most fitting. (Metropolitan Museum)